Statistics on black and white dating

The biggest decline has occurred among nonblacks: Today, 14% of nonblacks say they would oppose a close relative marrying a black person, down from 63% in 1990. Although Asian and Hispanic newlyweds are most likely to be intermarried, overall increases in intermarriage have been driven in part by rising intermarriage rates among black and white newlyweds.

Asian and Hispanic newlyweds are the most likely to be intermarried. The most dramatic increase has occurred among black newlyweds, whose intermarriage rate more than tripled from 5% in 1980 to 18% in 2015.

Nearly four-in-ten adults (39%) say the growing number of people marrying someone of a different race is good for society, up from 24% in 2010.

Adults younger than 30, those with at least a bachelor’s degree and those who identify as a Democrat or lean Democratic are especially likely to say this.

To understand race gaps in income and wealth at the household level, we have to look not only at education and earnings at the individual level, but also at patterns of family formation and marriage.

There has been a significant increase in rates of four-year college completion among black Americans, especially women.

The next most common intermarriage pairings are one white and one Asian spouse (15%).

Among all married people in 2015 (not just those who recently wed), 10% are now intermarried – 11 million in total.

Americans today also are less likely to oppose a close relative marrying someone of a different race or ethnicity.

Now, 10% say they would oppose such a marriage in their family, down from 31% in 2000.

So black Americans are still much less likely to get an undergraduate degree.

But even when they do, they are less able to create greater economic security, at least as measured by household wealth, as new data from the Survey of Consumer Finances shows: In fact, black households headed by a college graduate are less wealthy than less-educated white ones.

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